16.4.11

Global south, Global north, Global church



It is often said that Christianity has become compromised in aligning itself with the postmodern western culture of relativism and individualism, that we are governed by social mores which began to change in the 1960s. How interesting to think that the Global South might similarly be guided by its culture and society and the intrinsic values held. Perhaps scriptural interpretation is swayed on both sides by cultural contamination:


...it is commonplace to assert, for example, that currently the Episcopal Church in the USA and the Anglican Church in Nigeria are different in their approach to sexual ethics. Others will talk differently. They will say that they are very similar indeed. Each is developing, in their church, ministerial policies that reflect the law and current opinion of their respective societies. Neither is taking a strong counter-cultural stance. Each is allowing the norms for a good society, as these are understood, have developed and are expressed in the laws of their country to inform ministerial practice and strategy (Smith, B., 2008. ‘Approaching Lambeth’. Address by Bishop of Edinburgh to his diocesan synod. http://www.edinburgh.anglican.org/media/downloads/bishop_17_jun_08.pdf).

2 comments:

Dreaming Beneath the Spires said...

Jesus was so revolutionary that they had to crucify him to get him to shut up! When the church has no discernible difference in lifestyle, thinking or worries from the surrounding culture, it makes you wonder if she has got something wrong.
Thank you for the blog roll add for Dreaming Beneath the Spires. I have changed my URL to match the title. The new URL is dreamingbeneaththespires.blogspot.com. Would it be possible to add the new URL to your blogroll please, as the old URL will no longer work.
You are on my blog roll too, of course.
Thanks much,
Anita

Rach said...

Will do, thank you Anita

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