19.6.08

LOOKS LIKE A GOOD READ? ANY OPINIONS?

Fear or Freedom?: Why a Warring Church Must Change
by Simon Barrow (Ed.)
£12.95

The ugly public rows over sexuality, authority and the interpretation of the Bible in the Anglican Communion leave many people not caught up in internecine church conflict baffled and frustrated.

  • What has this bitterness got to do with the Gospel and Jesus’ message of radical emancipation?
  • Why is there so much fuss over a denomination that often appears a colonial hangover?
  • What about the far more pressing issues of war, peace, development, environment, science and spirituality?
  • How does such infighting impact the credibility of the Christian message in the twenty-first century?

With a short preface from Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, Fear or Freedom? takes a constructively critical look at the significance of ‘Anglican wars’ in the run up to (and well beyond) the much publicised 2008 Lambeth Conference, signalling some important fault lines in post-Christendom life and faith.

Drawing on material from the religion and society think-tank Ekklesia, the book asks why many historic churches are in a mess and how they can change. Its message is positive. The churches can - and must - abandon their obsession with top-down control, and rediscover the Gospel as a subversive source of hope in society at large.

Contributors: Simon Barrow and Jonathan Bartley (Co-directors of Ekklesia), Glynn Cardy (St Matthew’s-in-the-City, Auckland, New Zealand), Deirdre Good (Professor of New Testament, The General Theological Seminary, New York), Savitri Hensman (Equalities adviser and writer, UK and Sri Lanka), Tim Nafziger (Christian Peacemaker Teams, USA), Chris Rowland (Dean Ireland Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture, University of Oxford) and David Wood (Parish priest and university chaplain, Western Australia).

ISBN: 9781905565146 (2008) 139pp

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